Call Us011-4166-8088, 90155-96280, 9313565406

Send Sms'PROJHELP' to 93135-65406

Mail Usinfo@projecthelpline.in

PROJECT REPORT

ON

ANALYTICAL STUDY OF BRANDING & EXPANSION OF FRANCHISE NETWORK OF PRESCHOOL

(A CASE STUDY OF KIDZEE)

UNDER SUPERVISION OF

SUBMITTED BY

NAME:

ENROLLMENT NO. :

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for qualifying

Master of Business Administration

In

Marketing


CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that …………………..a student has completed project work on titled ANALYTICAL STUDY OF BRANDING & EXPANSION OF FRANCHISE NETWORK OF PRESCHOOL (A CASE STUDY OF KIDZEE ) under my guidance and supervision.

I certify that this is an original work and has not been copied from any source.

Signature of Guide                  :____________________________

Name of Project Guide           :____________________________

Date                                         :____________________________

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

With Candor and Pleasure I take opportunity to express my sincere thanks and obligation to my esteemed guide ………………….. It is because of her able and mature guidance and co-operation without which it would not have been possible for me to complete my project.

It is my pleasant duty to thank all the staff member of the computer center who never hesitated me from time during the project.

Finally, I gratefully acknowledge the support, encouragement & patience of my family, and as always, nothing in my life would be possible without God, Thank You!

NAME:

ENROLLMENT NO:

DECLARATION

I, the undersigned, hereby declare that the Project Report entitled ANALYTICAL STUDY OF BRANDING & EXPANSION OF FRANCHISE NETWORK OF PRESCHOOL (A CASE STUDY OF KIDZEE) is my original work and the conclusions drawn therein are based on the material collected by myself.

NAME:

ENROLLMENT NO:

CHAPTER – 1

INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

Franchising is the practice of using another firm’s successful business model. The word ‘franchise’ is of Anglo-French derivation – from franc – meaning free, and is used both as a noun and as a (transitive) verb. For the franchisor, the franchise is an alternative to building ‘chain stores‘ to distribute goods that avoids the investments and liability of a chain. The franchisor’s success depends on the success of the franchisees. The franchisee is said to have a greater incentive than a direct employee because he or she has a direct stake in the business.

Essentially, and in terms of distribution, the franchisor is a supplier who allows an operator, or a franchisee, to use the supplier’s trademark and distribute the supplier’s goods. In return, the operator pays the supplier a fee.

Thirty three countries, including the United States, and Australia, have laws that explicitly regulate franchising, with the majority of all other countries having laws which have a direct or indirect impact on franchising.

Although franchisor revenues and profit may be listed in a franchise disclosure document (FDD), no laws require an estimate of franchisee profitability, which depends on how intensively the franchisee ‘works’ the franchise. Therefore, franchisor fees are typically based on ‘gross revenue from sales’ and not on profits realized. See remuneration.

Various tangibles and intangibles such as national or international advertisingtraining and other support services are commonly made available by the franchisor. Franchise brokers help franchisors find appropriate franchisees. There are also main ‘master franchisors’ who obtain the rights to sub-franchise in a territory. According to the International Franchise Association approximately 4% of all businesses in the United States are franchisee-worked.

It should be recognized that franchising is one of the only means available to access venture investment capital without the need to give up control of the operation of the chain and build a distribution system for servicing it. After the brand and formula are carefully designed and properly executed, franchisors are able to sell franchises and expand rapidly across countries and continents using the capital and resources of their franchisees while reducing their own risk.

Franchisor rules imposed by the franchising authority are usually very strict in the US and most other countries need to study them carefully to protect small or start-up franchisee in their own countries. Besides the trademark, there are proprietary service marks which may be copyrighted and corresponding regulations.

Whether it is a food franchise, home-based franchise, automotive franchise, sign franchise, senior care franchise, we will be able to provide you with franchise information on the selections that meet your criteria. Perhaps a home based business is a better fit for you. Search based on your criteria and sees only what fits your needs.

FRANCHISEMART is a franchise consulting service for people looking for a more efficient and effective way to research the world of franchising before making an investment into a franchise. Our concept makes us unique. Our expertise makes us the best. Franchise Mart represents over 100 franchises and business opportunities throughout 15 locations, in 3 countries around the world! Let one of our Franchise Mart franchise consultants guide and coach you through a 3 step process of selecting the right franchise or business opportunity for you.

Franchise generally means a right or privilege. It may refer to:

Suffrage, the civil right to vote

In sport:

  • Franchise, a term for a team in the type of professional sports league organization most commonly found in North America; seeNorth American professional sports league organization
    • Franchise player, a player on such a team around whom an entire competitive squad can be built
    • Franchise tag, a designation of a player in the US National Football League whose contract is soon to expire that binds him to the team for one year at an enhanced salary
    • League franchise, a local or regional business franchising operation under a particular sporting league in activities such as pool, darts, etc.
Franchise Opportunities in India

Franchises can help you succeed in business with their proven business models, training, promotions, as well as support.

  1. You must do your research on Franchises with an excellent track record of successes.
  2. Make sure you have personally visited at a few Franchisees youself and experienced their offerings.
  3. Research sufficiently to ascertain that Products and Services have high likelyhood of success in your town / area.

4. Meet company officials and get full details on training, tools and support provided by them.

5. Lastly, have a full understanding of costs and margins that you will have to share with the Principals.

Now India has proved itself as one of the largest industrial hubs in the world. With the growing perspective image, it opens new doors for small business owner.

At present time there are numerous types of opportunities are available for business owner, investors and franchisors. Even small scale business owner can also select the franchise opportunities for brand expansion. As seeing the rapid growth of Indian market, more numbers of people are entering in this business to start their own.

For entering in business world, the potentials look partners or brand name so that they can easily open the branch or set up the business in new market. For them franchise business model always help the entrepreneur to work with brand name.

Franchise business model always help the entrepreneurs who have low cost investment and want to extend their footprints world wild. Day by day franchising opportunities are increasing because it’s not only cover the food and beverage sector but also covering the each and every expanding sector.

There are so many sectors that offer wide range of franchise business opportunity such as playschool, preschool activities, home based business, online work, photography, travelling etc. Out of them, playschools have become the most promising sector in providing the best opportunities for entrepreneurs. Even women or housewives are also earning money by set up the playschool at home. Many preschools like shamrock, Little Elly, podar jumbo kids, sesame Hellokids and also many preschools are witnessing huge business opportunities. They offer chance to start the business with new ideas like develop music class, home tuitions, playschools activity, child care and day care. These opportunities not only boost up the individual business owner but also make the brand famous. Another brand like sunshine preschool has decided to open daycare centers in India. After investing in the small business it carries out the brand in India with the help of business consultancy.

Seeing the present scenario of Indian market scope for the growth of small business opportunities, it is an important factor to improve the marketing capabilities, because it boosts the growth of small business. Before implement the business model everyone must have to understand the business strategies and modern tactics. For getting the high growth in business the aspiring entrepreneurs must implement everything in planned way.

Now in India, the small business investors have also made their presence in franchise industry. As they started their business on small scale and after got the popularity and positive result they have extented it across the country. With retail franchises, internet franchises & services franchises, the entrepreneurs are expanding their business from their residence as well as the office place. So starting the business with low investment is also a good option to make strong presence in corporate world.

Franchise Factor:

The measurement of the impact on a company’s price-earnings (P/E) ratio per unit growth in new investment. For example, a franchise factor of 3 would indicate that the P/E ratio of a company would increase by three units for every unit of growth in the company’s book value. The franchise factor can be calculated as the product of annual investment returns in excess of market returns and the duration of the returns. A P/E ratio will not be elevated with a high franchise factor alone.

‘Franchise Factor’

A company with a high franchise factor will have exceptionally high P/E ratios in comparison to its book value. This comes from the ability to continually capitalize on basic strengths, rather than the financial strength of the business. Because this is the case in many franchises, the term “franchise factor” was developed. Selecting a new franchisee can be a big risk for a franchise. Will this person perform well? Will they grow the business? Will their customers form a favourable opinion of the brand? But it’s also a big risk for a new franchisee, not only in terms of money, but also in terms of their time, labour and emotional commitment.

For everyone concerned, it’s important to get it right.

How can franchisors – and prospective franchisees – make sure they make the right decision?

CVs and interviews reveal only so much. They don’t reveal, for example, whether this person is a strategic thinker or someone who is happier following proven processes. They also don’t reveal very well whether this person is a team player or a sole operator, or what their learning style is.

Psychometric testing and analysis can reveal that information, helping prospective franchisees and franchisors make more informed, and successful, decisions about whether this is a comfortable fit that will result in an effective franchisee that grows the business. Some people get scared when they hear the term ‘psychometric testing’. But really, all it’s doing is measuring how people relate to others, what they will pay attention to, what they might pay less attention to, what will motivate them – and applying that to the demands of the job. It’s about ensuring the right fit between person, role and work culture.

How does it work?

Effective psychometric testing, or assessment, will provide a detailed picture of an individual’s strengths, weaknesses, motivations, working style and preferred work environment.

By considering the interaction between many different facets of an individual’s personality, their abilities, personal style and ideal working environment, it will then predict how they are likely to perform in a given work setting.

When you add to the test in-depth analysis by a registered psychologist that translates into how likely they are to succeed in that franchise.

Here’s an analogy: if abilities are like the size of a person’s car engine, then personal style is the way they like to drive, and ideal working environment describes the conditions they prefer to drive in. Only when you consider them all, can you predict how that person is likely to behave on the road.

How do you know what makes a good franchisee?

When franchisers regularly use a reputable and effective psychometric test on their franchisees, and prospective franchisees, they can quickly build up a profile of key success factors and high fail factors for their particular business. Selector Ltd did this during a research project. The project set out to assess franchisees in several different systems, finding out what factors star performers shared, and what common factors were tripping others up. The results were instructive.

Across all the systems, successful franchisees tend to be strategic in their abilities but have low openness to new ideas. In other words, they see the big picture and understand what the franchisor is trying to achieve, but they don’t try to rework your standard operational procedures or constantly suggest new ways of doing things.

However, there are also differences. In a retail franchise system, strong logical reasoning and overall intelligence show as a success factor. This means the franchise can hold very conceptual planning and strategy meetings, confident its high-performers will absorb and act on the information.

In food retailing and health franchise systems, high overall intelligence and logical reasoning are not factors for success. In these systems hands-on, operational learners perform best. The implications for training are obvious: any training should be practical, hands-on and working with the product.

With information like this, franchisors can benchmark prospective franchisees and see how they measure up.
Take, for example, openness to new ideas. One “problem child” franchisee in one system has high openness to new ideas (always wanting to try new things), while more successful franchisees are less open to new ideas. By comparing prospective franchisees against existing scores, franchisors can see very quickly whether this person scores closer to successful franchisees, or whether they are more likely to have problems similar to the struggling franchisee.
For the retail franchise, the assessment reveals a struggling franchisee is low on strategic reasoning. Now it becomes clear – whenever there are any major changes in strategy or process, when a new initiative is launched, this franchisee will need one-on-one explanation, to successfully help them through the change process.

How can psychometric testing help franchisors?

By identifying what leads to success in each system, and what strongly predicts difficulty, effective psychometric testing can help franchisors decrease franchisee churn by consistently selecting prospects who will thrive and grow in the business.

But sometimes it’s not as clear-cut as “this person definitely fits” or “this person definitely does not”. Sometimes, psychometric testing will reveal a person has many strengths but a few weaknesses that might cause issues.

For example, your prospect may have the right amount of strategic ability, the right preference for teamwork, enough but not too much openness to new ideas, but poor attention to detail and low orderliness.

Now you know where their weak points are. As a result, your relationship manager can start calling in right from the beginning to see how the systems are going, and whether the franchisee is up to date with their paperwork. You can implement personalised management and training for this person, to ensure the business benefits from their strengths, but doesn’t get tripped up by their weaknesses.

How does psychometric testing help franchisees?

It’s not all about the franchisor – psychometric testing can really make a difference to existing and prospective franchisees as well.

I’ve already explained how, once a franchisor knows a franchisee’s weaknesses, management and training can be individually tailored to overcome them. But even before that, if a prospective franchisee is benchmarked against the system’s success and fail factors, they can be confident they are investing in a business they have every likelihood of succeeding in. It may even make it easier for them to access the bank funding they need to buy their franchise. Before lending, a bank has to decide whether the new business can service the loan from expected cash flow, and in these difficult economic times, those cash flows may not be so assured.

If the new business is a franchise, the bank also wants to know the franchisee will have a strong chance of succeeding.

How franchisors demonstrate whether prospects fit the business is crucial. Banks want to know new franchisees have been measured against defined and robust selection criteria. Not just any selection criteria, but criteria that benchmark them against other successful franchisees in the same system. (In franchising, unlike investment, past results can be an excellent indicator of future performance!)

To the bank, knowing that the franchisee has met brand-specific selection criteria is just as important as the business’s financial projections. Banks will take notice of that evidence in making their decision to lend.

Removing the guesswork

Selecting franchisees is a complex process. Too often, decisions are made based on gut feel, or selection criteria that have never been tested.

But in choosing franchisees based on what they feel comfortable with, franchisors may be hiring the wrong people – and missing out on people who would really help their business grow. Psychometric testing removes the confusion and tests for what really matters – what will really make a difference to business success.

It removes the guesswork so that franchisor and franchisee alike know this is a decision that will work for both of them and lead to an effective, prosperous and rewarding business.

Technology

Tremendous amounts of data and information are available today, making site selection more scientific and less seat-of-the-pants than in the past. Demographic and psychographic databases, combined with traffic flow, maps, and future projections can be crunched to perfection by today’s data analysis and modeling software. Ask your franchisor if they can provide access to these tools.

Rent/lease vs. buy/own

Money is nearly always a limiting factor when starting any kind of franchise. In addition to the franchise fee and build-out costs, new businesses take time to turn a profit and need a cash cushion to keep afloat until they begin to show a profit. That’s a strong reason to consider renting when you start out: it reduces your risk by not locking you into monthly payments on a property. How do you know a site will work until you’ve tried it for three or six months or longer? Leasing with an option to buy could work, but many advise not to buy until you have a greater level of certainty about the profit the business will generate. All circumstances are different, and tax considerations could come into play as well.

Build or existing unit?

In the case of standalone concepts, it’s less expensive to take over or move into an existing unit than to build a new one from the ground up. Some franchisors may stipulate that you build a new unit, but at this stage (signed franchise agreement) you will know this. In the boom years preceding the subprime recession, it was a seller’s market for real estate. After the economy tanked, the pendulum swung quickly, opening up many “A” locations and great deals on rents, tenant improvements, and more. Those able to take advantage of this market before it swings back (and markets always will) will position themselves for success and have a competitive advantage for years to come.

Negotiating with landlords

Landlords negotiate leases and rents for a living. Do you? That’s why it’s smart to find some help, from your franchisor, a real estate professional, or both. It’s also wise to shop several sites to give you an idea of prices, terms, fees, and what is and is not negotiable in your territory. You’ll also learn a lot as you speak with different landlords and shopping center managers, which will serve you well in your next negotiation.

Brokers, agents, and attorneys

As noted, you’re new to this game. Hire a professional to help you get the best deal–and to avoid getting taken for a ride. Brokers or real estate agents should have local experience and connections. They should know something about franchising if possible, and ideally about your industry. And before signing any lease or contract, run it past an attorney who understands franchising and knows the territory.

Look ahead

You’ve found an underserved area just clamoring for your product or service, and are eyeing what appears to be a prime site. Now it’s time to start asking questions:
What’s nearby in terms of other retail? Is there critical mass to draw customers to the neighborhood, or will you a sole destination for the foreseeable future? It’s good to get in early, but can you afford to wait for the neighborhood to develop?
Or perhaps you’ve found a gold mine of customers but it’s not a residential area and there’s no public transportation. How will your employees get to and from work? Will they put up with a long commute if they can get the same minimum wage where they live?

Things change: Check with local and state officials on any plans for future development. Traffic patterns may be ideal today, but will they remain so? Ask local, regional, and state planners if changes are afoot in the coming years. Will a major road reconstruction cut off access to your front door? Will nearby streets go one-way and reduce your critical drive-thru traffic? Conversely, is there a project in the works that could increase your traffic? Look ahead as best you can for the duration of your lease. Unexpected changes could make or break you.

Malls and kiosks

In 2008 and 2009, mall tenants cleared out in droves as retail and commercial real estate took it on the chin. In previous years, locating in a mall with strong national anchor tenants was the goal. But with large national retailers failing and/or reducing their number of stores, smaller retailers began to have second thoughts. A franchisor in Florida who tried for years to get into an upscale mall said that when space became available after some prime tenants exited, he had second thoughts about opening there. While you can write into your lease that your rent will be reduced by 50 percent if Kmart or Circuit City or Borders moves out, you still need foot traffic to succeed.

Patience gets you an “A”

Seasoned franchisees advise that it’s better to wait for an “A” location than to open in a “B” or “C” site just to get going. While speed to market is always a consideration, “Haste makes waste” rules the day if you select a less-than-optimal site.

Safe or sorry?

Sometimes a location appears perfect but has problems you can’t see. Talk to the police about the site and the neighborhood, asking for its crime history, and for any other perspective or advice they can provide. Check crime rate trends. Is the neighborhood on the rise or in decline? Speak to the business owners in the area and ask them about the neighborhood. You will not only find out valuable information, you’ll likely make friends and build alliances as you go.

Ask successful franchisees

Another great source of help and advice can be found in current franchisees. Ask them what makes their location successful; what they wish they did differently in choosing their site; and what advice they might have for you. Compile a list of the features they cite as contributing to their success, as well as those to avoid. They’re not in your territory, so they’re not competitors – and if they’re smart, they’ll like seeing another successful unit to help build the brand and penetrate new markets.

Economic incentives

You can save a lot of money if your area has tax incentives you can use. Check with local, regional, state, and federal officials to see if any of the sites you’re considering qualify for tax breaks on hiring, job creation, or other grounds.

Resources

1) The “Franchise Site Evaluation Form” in the book “Franchise Bible” by Erwin Keup (6th Edition, 2007, pp. 37-41), contains a detailed checklist of what to look for when evaluating different sites. Go to Google Books and search by the book name. The pages are online.

2) For restaurant franchises, read QSR magazine’s short article “Site Selection 101,” which offers advice from basics such as visibility, access, and parking to lesser-known factors such as easements, flood plains, and other survey items.

3) Lease negotiation (and renegotiation) tips can be found in an article by Jeremy Behar, CEO of Cirrus Tenant Lease Services: www.mufranchisee.com/article/648/.

4) More negotiating tips can be found in “Dear Landlord: This May Be the Best Time in Years To Be a Tenant,” by Dan Rowe

Mid-sized franchises like restaurants, gasoline stations and trucking stations involve substantial investment and require all the attention of a businessperson.

There are also large franchises like hotels, spas and hospitals, which are discussed further under technological alliances.

Two important payments are made to a franchisor: (a) a royalty for the trademark and (b) reimbursement for the training and advisory services given to the franchisee. These two fees may be combined in a single ‘management’ fee. A fee for “disclosure” is separate and is always a “front-end fee”.

A franchise usually lasts for a fixed time period (broken down into shorter periods, which each require renewal), and serves a specific territory or geographical area surrounding its location. One franchisee may manage several such locations. Agreements typically last from five to thirty years, with premature cancellations or terminations of most contracts bearing serious consequences for franchisees. A franchise is merely a temporary business investment involving renting or leasing an opportunity, not the purchase of a business for the purpose of ownership. It is classified as a wasting asset due to the finite term of the license.

Franchise fees are on average 6.7% with an additional average marketing fee of 2%

A franchise can be exclusive, non-exclusive or ‘sole and exclusive’.

Although franchisor revenues and profit may be listed in a franchise disclosure document (FDD), no laws require an estimate of franchisee profitability, which depends on how intensively the franchisee ‘works’ the franchise. Therefore, franchisor fees are typically based on ‘gross revenue from sales’ and not on profits realized. See remuneration.

Various tangibles and intangibles such as national or international advertisingtraining and other support services are commonly made available by the franchisor.

Franchise brokers help franchisors find appropriate franchisees. There are also main ‘master franchisors’ who obtain the rights to sub-franchise in a territory.

According to the International Franchise Association approximately 4% of all businesses in the United States are franchisee-worked.

It should be recognized[citation needed] that franchising is one of the only means available to access venture investment capital without the need to give up control of the operation of the chain and build a distribution system for servicing it. After the brand and formula are carefully designed and properly executed, franchisors are able to sell franchises and expand rapidly across countries and continents using the capital and resources of their franchisees while reducing their own risk.

Franchisor rules imposed by the franchising authority are usually very strict in the US and most other countries need to study them carefully to protect small or start-up franchisee in their own countries.[citation needed] Besides the trademark, there are proprietary service marks which may be copyrighted, and corresponding regulations.

Social Franchises

In recent years, the idea of franchising has been picked up by the social enterprise sector, which hopes to simplify and expedite the process of setting up new businesses. A number of business ideas, such as soap making, whole food retailing, aquarium maintenance, and hotel operation have been identified as suitable for adoption by social firms employing disabled and disadvantaged people

SCHOOL PROFILE:

With over 900+ pre-schools in more than 330+ cities across the country, Kidzee is the largest pre-school chain in Asia. Kidzee has touched the lives of more than 200,000 children since its inception in 2003. Currently Kidzees across the country have over 40000 students.

Its proprietary pedagogy, ILLUME is what sets Kidzee a class apart from other pre-school chains. Illume is an approach that helps parents and teachers spot the unique potential in each child and help them realize it. This new pedagogy was instituted by Kidzee after conducting an action research carried out across 20,000 parents, 2000 teachers & 1, 30,000 children. ILLUME is different from the one size fits all approach followed in most of the preschools. It lays before a child diverse pathways.  With keen observation, a note is made of the preferred learning style of each child. Once this is concluded, activities are built around his/her preferred learning style. This approach ensures that no pressure is enforced on the child and hence they grow at their own pace. The child learns HOW to think rather than WHAT to think.

Illume was independently validated by M S University, Baroda in January 2010. The content, methodology and assessment techniques of the program were found to be developmentally appropriate and child centered.  Moreover, the infrastructure at Kidzee centers was found be safe, welcoming, stimulating, interesting and child friendly.

Zee Learn was honoured by being chosen as the sole India Representative at OMEP World Congress in August 2010. Organisation Mondiale pour l’Education Préscolaire (OMEP) is an international, nongovernmental and non profit-making organisation dedicated to all aspects of early childhood education and care (ECEC). Zee Learn was chosen for our education philosophy and for having the widest footprint in the country. Our academic head – Mrs Nitya Ramaswami, presented a paper and poster on “Universalisation of quality pre-school education” at this august assembly.

Purpose

Zee Learn’s stated purpose is to Improve Human Capital through quality education and development.

We believe that each and every individual has a unique potential. We help individuals (children & youth) realize their unique potential through our school network, school innovations, youth vocational institutes and online ventures.

In this righteous quest, we maintain our central values

  • Integrity – Doing what we said we’ll do
  • Ownership – Owning what we do
  • Leadership – Leading the change
  • Trust – oneself and others
  • Continuous Learning – For continuous improvement
Overview

Zee Learn is one of the leading companies in Education in India with the fastest growing chain of K-12 schools and India’s No 1 chain of pre-schools in its portfolio.

Zee Learn acts as a consultant to local entrepreneurs who wish to setup K-12 schools, under its brand name Mount Litera Zee Schools and provides end to end Education management and Advisory services.  Mount Litera Zee Schools is now the second largest chain of schools in the private-unaided category with 65 schools in 48 cities. Launched in December 2008, 60 schools signed up in one year make Mount Litera Zee School the fastest growing school chain in India.

Zee Learn also runs India’s No. 1 chain of pre-schools, Kidzee with more than 900+ pre-schools in more than 330+ cities. Kidzee is a pioneer in organized and standardized pre-schooling in the country. Kidzee has touched the lives of more than 200,000 children since its inception in 2003. During the current FY 2010-11 Kidzee has seen enrolment of more than 36,000students.

Enabled by its extensive experience in understanding of education and learning, Zee Learn is extending its services to other schools. Zee Learn School Innovations works with existing schools to improve their student outcomes and efficiency through a School Audit that identifies improvement areas.

Zee Learn has also tied up with Gakken Education Co. with an aim to bring the best of Japanese education in the field of science to schools in India. The Brain Café intends to improve conceptual understanding and develop scientific temper amongst students by providing hands on experiment tools.

In the wake of the recent increase in disposable incomes in the country and rising awareness of global standards of education amongst parents, there is a demand for international standard pre-schools. To meet this requirement, Zee Learn plans to launch a chain of Premium preschools called Mount Litera World Preschools. These pre-schools would be company owned or joint ventures with progressive individuals or entities.

Youth today is looking for vocational education outside the ambit or traditional higher education.  Zee Institute of Media Arts (ZIMA) is a TV and Film training institute in Mumbai that offers diploma courses in Direction, Acting, Sound, Editing, Production and Cinematography. Zee Institute of Creative Art (ZICA) is the nation’s first full-fledged Classical and Digital Animation Training Academy that trains youth in classical 2D and modern 3D animation in 15 cities across the country.

Kidzee, the largest network of preschool in India has earned for itself a reputed name and has become parents’ first choice for pre-schooling in the country. By pioneering Early Childhood Care & Education, Kidzee has touched the lives of more than 200,000 children since its inception in 2003.

Kidzee believes that Every Child is Unique and has an infinite potential. With years of dedicated research done by its CDE (Child Development & Education) experts, Kidzee has developed the best-in-class child centric learning methodology called ‘iLLUME’. Through iLLUME, Kidzee ensures that every child learns and develops his / her unique potential.

Its proprietary pedagogy, iLLUME is what sets Kidzee a class apart from other pre-school chains. Illume is an approach that helps parents and teachers spot the unique potential in each child and help them realize it. This new pedagogy was instituted by Kidzee after a thorough research carried out with around 20,000 parents, 2000 teachers & 1, 30,000 children. ILLUME is different from the one size fits all approach. With keen observation, a note is made of the preferred learning style of each child. Once this is concluded, activities are built around his/her preferred learning style. This approach ensures that no pressure is enforced on the child and hence they grow at their own pace. The child learns HOW to think rather than WHAT to think.

Illume was independently validated by M S University, Baroda in January 2010. The content, methodology and assessment techniques of the program were found to be developmentally appropriate and child centered.  Moreover, the infrastructure at Kidzee centers was found be safe, welcoming, stimulating, interesting and child friendly.
Kidzee runs on a franchisee based model and has won numerous awards as an Education Franchisor at both National and International Forums. With around 2,00,000 satisfied Alumni, they have also trained over 10,000 early childhood educators, nurturing them to be teachers and giving them a fulfilling career. With more than 1000 centres in 330 + cities, its main focus is to provide children with child-friendly curriculum and a child safe learning environment.
Kidzee, under its umbrella brand Zee Learn has built another campaign ‘I Care’ – a national movement to change the way individuals think about prevention of child abuse. By focusing on community activities and preschool and school policies that prioritize healthy child development, this movement is to ensure that child abuse and neglect never occurs in the first place.

Our Vision

Kidzee Blossoms laid its foundation in Nov 2010 with the motto ‘Shaping your child’s today for a better tomorrow’. Our motto is a vision with a much bigger aim and focus. With every growing year we foresee new horizons and thereby set new standards. We are our own competitor. We do understand that what a child learns at school prepares him for a career & what he learns at home prepares him for life. We envision that our preschool ,as it is growing through a positive word of mouth, as much can truly continue to grow and give a complete child friendly world to each student & enable us to develop the kids into very promising, smart & confident children. Keeping in rhythm with today’s world, new & latest techniques like E-learning have been introduced. We look forward not only to keep up the standards we have created but to make them even better in the forthcoming years.


CHAPTER –2

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

The literature for review to be collected from secondary sources such as magazines, articles, reports, budgets, news paper etc to highlight the problems and findings of the study done by many research and business professionals. Many studies have been conducted regarding the branding and franchise expansion network. Some of these are as follows: -Basic education is the foundation on which an individual grows and a country progresses.

Branding is a process that is used by the businesses to utilize marketing strategies to enhance their product or service image so that it is more readily recollected by the customer. Branding helps the product or service to make a favorable impact on the target customer while the branding concepts help in outlining the guidelines that should be followed during the branding process. Branding of any product and service should follow some constants that help in establishing a brand in the long run. The internet branding strategies should have the following constants in your branding formula:

Branding should be simple

The most popular brands in the world have very simple, easy to remember logos. The reason behind this concept is, we tend to remember and associate ourselves with simple things and choose to ignore or forget complex ideas.

Branding should be different
Your brand should have individuality, should be different. The brand should stand out from other similar product or service; otherwise the whole idea of branding is lost. Only an individualistic brand makes a mark on the psyche of the target customer and he remembers it when he makes a buying decision. This is why most of the MNCs take strict action on trademark violations.

Branding should be safe

Play safe and do your research if you are catering to international audience. If you are using symbols in your logo make sure they do not offend the target market in any way or you can chances of shutting your shop before making any sales. Therefore keep the regional and cultural sensibilities in mind during the branding process. The three most important branding concepts that are the basis of all branding processes are brand promise, brand attributes and brand personality. A brand promise is a promise or commitment the company makes to its customers. The promise should be clearly stated and tells about the most important benefit of the product or customer. Brand attributes are the features that describe the customer�s experience like quality, innovation or customer service. The attributes help the company to deliver the brand promise. Brand personality is the characteristic the customer experiences when they experience the brand. Thus the essence of the brand is a symbiosis of all three.
In 1966, “The Atlanta Journal and Constitution” reported that a Longhorn Steaks franchise in Alabama was suing its franchisor claiming that the Georgia-based franchise had encroached on its territory by opening other restaurants in the state.  The franchisee alleged it had suffered $7.5 million in damages. The owners claimed the whole state of Alabama after they opened franchises in Birmingham.  Instead, Longhorn Steaks, Inc. had opened company-owned sites in southern Alabama.  The lawsuit, filed September 13, 1996, further alleged that Longhorn Steaks’ Chief Executive Officer offered to buy the Alabama franchisee’s operation.

The franchisor declined comment on this point, but filed as its defense that the franchisee-franchisor agreement did not prevent Longhorn Steaks from opening company-owned restaurants in Alabama. (Higginbotham, October 5, 1996).  This was one of many court proceedings that arose out of this issue, referred to in this Handbook as “Network Expansion Conflict”, or its popular name—“Encroachment.”

The authors believe that “encroachment” implies that the franchisor has breached its contract, or at least has acted in bad faith with one or more franchisees.  Network Expansion Conflict more accurately describes the dynamics when a franchisor expands its network, either by adding traditional or non-traditional outlets or new distribution channels. While expansion does not necessarily imply “encroachment,” it does, in some circumstances, bring the franchisor and franchisee(s) into conflict.  The Longhorn Steaks lawsuit challenged whether the franchisor had breached its agreement with the franchisee.

Network Expansion Conflict (hereafter referred to as NEC) is a relatively modern issue that has developed between franchisor and franchisee, stemming from the continuing growth and maturity of franchise systems. Earlier issues concerned lack of franchisor disclosure when purchasing a franchise; terminations and non-renewal of franchise relationships; inadequate communications between franchisor and franchisee; the requirement that the franchisee must purchase all or most of its products from the franchisor.

Most statutes on federal or state levels only addressed these issues when they concerned current or potential franchisees. Prior to 1980, NEC claims were virtually non-existent. They are now a relatively new phenomena in the courts (Bark off and Garner 1994). It is only in the past decade that NEC litigation has occurred, particularly 5   in the fast-food industry (Fox and Su 1995).

“Many fast-food franchises say they can’t make it because their key competitor is their own product. In general, franchisors can decide how many units can be opened in any one area.” [Galen March 22 1993].

“Indeed, dissidence is spreading throughout the fast-food industry. Franchisees of both the Subway sandwich chain and Checkers Drive-in Restaurants chain recently formed independent groups to see to their interests. Such wariness isn’t unexpected: As the fast-food industry matures, franchisers’ efforts to keep growing often collide with entrenched operators.” [Gibson April 17, 1996].

One commentator described today’s multiple paths of encroachment: “…in addition to worrying about other locations edging closer geographically, franchisees have to deal with them creeping through the Internet, mail order, kiosks, airports, gas station mini-marts and grocery stores” [Chun 1996, p. 150].

To be sure, there is a heightened level of tension between the franchisor’s interest in growth and the franchisee’s interest in avoiding encroachment.

“Franchisees are from Venus, franchisors are from Mars. Or is it the other way around? The differences in their perspectives are explained to some extent by their divergent economic interests. Franchisors typically earn money when overall system sales increase, while franchisees typically earn money when their franchised outlet turns a profit. Franchisors receive a lump sum franchise fee, usually, upon signing a franchise agreement for the opening of a new outlet, and then receive a percentage of that new outlet’s gross revenues as an ongoing royalty fee. The more openings, and the more system sales, the more money for the franchisor.

Franchisees, on the other hand, are more likely to be interested in ensuring profitable operations of their individual franchised outlets than in maximizing system wide revenues or opening new distribution points.

There are common interests, of course. Both franchisor and franchisee share an interest in managed growth of the system. No franchisor benefits from disgruntled or bankrupt franchisees. Both share an interest in doing well against their inter-brand competitors. But when a franchise outlet generates substantial sales, the divergent interests can overcome the common ones. A franchisee may be enjoying the profits generated by a successful outlet as a just reward for work done well and a risk that paid off. A franchisor may view the same highly successful outlet as evidence that the market it serves is ripe for another outlet.” [Thomson & Wolfson 1997, p.1].

Despite the lack of territorial protection in the franchise agreement, franchisees are concerned about their franchisor’s market development. They are accustomed to drawing their customers from a broad base, and object to a new unit opening close enough to lure away any of their business (Spandor 1997).

Franchisor responsibilities – define the procedure for analyzing potential adverse impact. Establish who in the franchisor organization will perform the analysis and what time frames will govern the process. Franchisee responsibilities – provide accurate data for the period before and after new location opening. Examples of such data are: sales, product mix reports, customer counts, profit and loss statements, participation in franchisor marketing programs, etc. Close monitoring of situations where there has been a sales decline that may be attributable to a new outlet or channel of distribution is critical to the process. Once the alarm has sounded, the franchisor will need to react immediately to gather factual information from the impacted outlet

Franchisors have taken various approaches in addressing the issue of exclusive franchise territories. Reviewing Item 12 of a sample of UFOCs shows a variety of different approaches to the respective territorial rights of the franchisor and franchisee

[Coldwell 1996].

These approaches go from granting a franchisee the right to operate only at a particular location, to granting an exclusive territory to the franchisee whereby the franchisor is not allowed to open either a franchised outlet or a company outlet within the boundaries of the “exclusive” territory.

Usually the franchisor will reserve the right to operate through other channels of distribution, though some allow the franchisee some of the revenue from such sales.  Because of an early judicial decision, many franchise agreements now clearly specify the franchisor’s right to establish additional outlets anywhere it chooses, as well as to distribute its products using different types of outlets, channels of distribution and competing brands. To accomplish this, franchisors alternate between using very broad 21 language and being painstakingly specific.

Franchisors are developing policies and procedures by which to resolve NEC in the best interests of both the franchisee and the franchisor. One of the best examples is the Burger King “Procedures For Resolving Development Disputes.” Burger King was a pioneer in developing a comprehensive written procedure to resolve NEC              disputes in the best interests of both parties. The Burger King plan has also been incorporated into the network’s franchise agreement [Barkoff and Giresi 1996].

This formal procedure grants Burger King Corporation the authority to approve the location of new outlets. However, if there is an unreasonable negative impact on existing outlets, the Burger King Corporation will compensate the adversely affected franchisee on a formula basis [Barkoff and Giresi 1996].

As a result, instead of the franchisee having to go to court and prove that the franchisor cannot legally impact an existing outlet, which has been violated, all the franchisee now must prove is that there is an actual adverse impact on his franchised outlet; that the new outlet caused the adverse impact; and that the level of impact was unreasonable under the circumstances. Burger King must notify each “Potentially Affected Franchisee” of a proposed new outlet. If the franchisee files an objection to a proposed outlet, the franchisee and Burger King must submit to mandatory mediation. If the mandatory mediation fails, the franchisee has the right either to litigate or go to binding arbitration.

Burger King Corporation and its franchisees realized they shared the common goal of maximizing the market potential of its brand by developing new outlets as quickly as possible in order to secure the best locations. This procedure could not have been developed through the courts or legislated on a federal or state level since it is unique to the Burger King system. As a result, the focus of attention is on determining the extent of damages, rather than the legal duties of the parties. Kidzee is one of the fastest growing preschool chains in the country. With over a many branches across India & Abroad, the chain is expanding at a very fast pace.

WHAT IS A MASTER FRANCHISE?

Simply owning the rights to a franchise territory is known as a Master Franchise or Area Representative Franchise. This territory can be either a metropolitan or an entire state.
Master Franchise – A simple term in the business of franchising which has made people rich by just sitting at home!! No extra efforts, no additional pains and yet many gains!!
The Master Franchisee assists the Franchisor in the sales and development of the assigned territory in exchange for a share in the FRANCHISE FEES – charged from every new school branch opened in the territory, under his domain. The amount is normally pre-decided and mutually agreed upon by both the Parent Franchise/Franchisor & the Master Franchisee.


CHAPTER – 3

OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Fixing the objective is like identifying the star. The objective decides where we want to go, what we want to achieve and what is our goal or destination.

Every study is carried out for the achievement of certain objectives.

  1. To identify the benefit of Branding and Expansion of franchise network of Preschool.
  2. To determine Opportunity for prospective franchisees for Preschool.
  3. To study about various tools for branding and expansion of franchise network of Preschool.
  4. To analyze various factor for successful franchisee.

SCOPE:

Scope of our study is very wide. We were studying on analytical study of branding & expansion of franchise network of preschool study of Kidzee School.

CHAPTER –4

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research methodology makes the most important contribution towards the enrichment of study. In a research there are numerous methods and procedure to be applied but it is the nature of the problem under investigation that determines the adoption of a particular method for all studies. Methods selected should always be appropriate to the problem under investigation.

REASEARCH DESIGN:-

The research design had been the combination of Exploratory and Descriptive designs. This study had been conducted in various steps:

  • Firstly, the relevant information had been collected to meet the need of objectives.
  • Secondly, an analysis had been made.
  • Thirdly, the finding and suggestion had been given.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

The data was collected using both by primary data collection methods as well as secondary sources.

PRIMARY DATA: Most of the information was gathered through primary sources.  The methods that were collect primary data are:

a)      Questionnaire

b)      Interview

SECONDARY DATA: Secondary data that was used are web sites and published materials related to branding & expansion of franchise network as well as any relevant information on KIDZEE.

The secondary data was collected through:

  • Internet
  • Magazines
  • Journals
  • Text books

[

SAMPLING TECHNIQUE:

The techniques used for conducting the study were convenience sampling technique as sample of respondents was chosen according to convenience.

STASTICAL TOOLS:

Statistical tools like mean score, percentage, average etc. were used in study for the purpose of analysis of data. Charts, figures and graphs were also used in order to make the data more represent able and easy to understand. The tools used in this study were MS-EXCEL and MS-WORD..

NUMBER OF RESPONDENTS : 50

AREA OF STUDY

DELHI

METHOD USE TO PRESENT DATA:

Data Analysis & Interpretation – Classification & tabulation transforms the raw data collected through questionnaire in to useful information by organizing and compiling the bits of data contained in each questionnaire i.e., observation and responses are converted in to understandable and orderly statistics are used to organize and analyze the data:

è Calculating the percentage of the responses.

è Formula used = (no. of responses / total responses) * 100

Graphical analysis by means of pie charts bar graphs etc.

LIKERT SCALES:

Likert scales are the four, five, six, seven, eight or nine point scales much used in various fields of research.

Often the scale is used as a semantic differential. A statement is given, and the endpoints correspond to agree strongly and disagree strongly. Use of the scales is practical and interesting. Scales with an even number of points do not have a midpoint and in that sense force a choice.


CHAPTER – 5

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

A detailed analysis of the study is necessary and is to be considered in order to compare the actual theory with that practical the variants of which may form the basis for improvements. Keeping this point in view and to fulfill the evaluation variants of which may form the basis for objectives of the studies an attempt has been made to segment the various respondents on the basis of some aspects collected from them through questionnaire. There are depicted through tables and graphs.

The copy of questionnaire administered is enclosed and the sample size was 50 respondents are enclosed at the end of this project. All the calculations and numerical interpretations are for 100%


Q1. How long have you been working for KIDZEE?

Table 1

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Less than 1 year 3 3%
1-3 years 8 8%
3-5 years 10 10%
5 years 12 12%
Above 5 years 17 17%

.

Analysis: 3% people said they are working in KIDZEE less than 1 year, 10% people said they are working 3-5 years, 5% people said they working from last 5 years and while left 17% people said they working from Above 5 years.

Q2. Do you agree that Preschool franchise, a profitable biz?

Table 2

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Highly Agree 22 22%
Agree 18 18%
Neutral 3 3%
Highly Disagree 4 4%
Disagree 3 3%

Analysis: 22% respondents Highly Agree that preschool franchise is profitable biz, 18% respondents only Agree with that, 3% respondents Neutral, 4% respondents Highly Disagree, 3% respondents Disagree that preschool franchise is profitable biz.

Q3. Are you satisfied with the environment of KIDZEE?

Table 3

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 48 48%
No 2 2%

.

Analysis: 48% people said yes they are satisfied with the environment of KIDZEE and 2% people said no they are not satisfied with the environment of KIDZEE.

Q4. Do you agree that franchising is the safest way to start a business?

Table 4

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Highly Agree 23 23%
Agree 15 15%
Neutral 5 5%
Highly Disagree 4 4%
Disagree 3 3%

.

Analysis: In above pie-graph 23% respondents Highly Agree that franchising is the safest way to start a business, 15% respondents only Agree, 5% respondents said they are Neutral, 4% respondents said they Highly Disagree that franchising is not the safest way to start a business. and while left 3% respondents Disagree.

Q5. Franchising is the best way to run a business?

Table – 5

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 47 47%
No 3 3%

.

Analysis: In above graph 47% people said yes franchising is the best way to run a business and 3% people said no franchising is not the best way to run a business.

Q6. I choose franchising because I want to start a brand of my own later?

Table – 6

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Highly Agree 12 12%
Agree 28 28%
Neutral 8 8%
Highly Disagree 1 1%
Disagree 1 1%

.

Analysis: 12% respondents Highly Agree to choose franchising because they want to start a brand to on their later, 28% respondents Agree to choose franchising, 8% Neutral, 1% Highly Disagree with to choose franchising.

Q7. Do you agree that KIDZEE will take Advantage of Brand Identity?

[

Table – 7

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Highly Agree 13 13%
Agree 12 12%
Neutral 10 10%
Highly Disagree 8 8%
Disagree 7 7%

Analysis: 13% people Highly Agree that KIDZEE take Advantage of Brand Identity, 12% people Agree that KIDZEE will take Advantage of Brand Identity, 8% people Highly Disagree that KIDZEE will not take advantage of brand identity and while left 7% disagree with that.

Q8. Existing infrastructure can be leveraged upon in a franchising option?

Table – 8

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 42 42%
No 8 8%

Analysis: 42% people said yes infrastructure is leveraged in a franchising option and 8% people said no infrastructure is not leveraged in a franchising option.

Q9. Do you know various tools for branding and expansion of franchise network of Preschool?

Table – 9

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 44 44%
No 6 6%

Analysis: In above graph 44% people said there is need of various tools for branding and expansion of franchise network of Preschool and 6% people said no branding and expansion is not franchise network of preschool.

Q10. You know resources does the franchisor have in place — and what resources is it willing to add– to handle growth?

Table – 10

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 38 38%
No 11 11%
Can’t say 1 1%

.

Analysis: In above graph 38% respondents said yes franchisor have place it is willing to add handle growth, 11% respondents said no franchisor have not place it is not willing to add  handle growth and while 1% respondents can’t say about this.

Q11.Having adequate capital is necessary to minimize the financial risk associated with starting a new business.

Table – 11

Criteria Frequency Percentage
Yes 28 28%
No 14 14%
Can’t say 8 8%

Analysis: In above graph 28% people said yes capital is necessary to minimize the financial risk to starting a new business, 14% people said no it is not a financial risk to start a new business and while left people can’t say.

CHAPTER – 6

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATION

Findings:

  1. It is finding that, 3% people said they are working in KIDZEE less than 1 year, 10% people said they are working 3-5 years, 5% people said they working from last 5 years and while left 17% people said they working from Above 5 years.
  2. 22% respondents highly Agree that preschool franchise is profitable biz, 18% respondents only agree with that, 3% respondents Neutral, 4% respondents Highly Disagree, 3% respondents Disagree that preschool franchise is profitable biz.
  3. As per the outcome of the study 48% people said yes they are satisfied with the environment of KIDZEE.
  4. 23% respondents Highly Agree that franchising is the safest way to start a business, 15% respondents only Agree, 5% respondents said they are Neutral, 4% respondents said they highly disagree that franchising is not the safest way to start a business and while left 3% respondents Disagree.
  5. It is finding that 47% of the respondents agree that franchising is the best way to run a business.
  6. 12% respondents highly agree to choose franchising because they want to start a brand to on their later, 28% respondents Agree to choose franchising, 8% Neutral, 1% Highly Disagree with to choose franchising.
  7. 13% people Highly Agree that KIDZEE take Advantage of Brand Identity, and 12% of the respondent agrees.
  8. As per the outcome of the study 42% people said yes infrastructure is leveraged in a franchising option.
  9. A large number of the respondents there is need of various tools for branding and expansion of franchise network of Preschool.

10.  38% respondents agree that franchisor have place it is willing to add handle growth.

11. Most of respondent said yes that capital is necessary to minimize the financial risk to starting a new business.

Recommendation

In our experience which I get from study. I would like to suggest following points.

  1. Expand its advertisement, emphasis on personal advertisement.
  2. Open more franchise in order to insure availability of good network.
  3. To make better schemes for franchise network of preschool.

CHAPTER – 7

CONCLUSION AND LIMITATION

Conclusion:

Franchise failure doesn’t only affect the franchisor and the franchisee, but also the customers and hence, by implication, the society as a whole. This effect is seen in the perceptions of the franchise in the marketplace. This also has the potential of affecting the success of future franchisees entering the market. Franchising is regarded as key to employment, and identifying critical success factors in the East African context can have an impact on the business environment.

This study, through an examination of businesses in the former category, has tried to identify the key indicators for franchise success. Businesses which have failed in the full business sense were not questioned, in an attempt to control for generic issues. Thus, whilst this study provides an insight into the key indicators for franchise success, it does not represent a comprehensive analysis of all factors which may lead a franchised firm to fail, but rather focuses on franchise specific issues.

Limitations of the Study:

The report may be beneficial to any company, but there are some limitations of the study:-

  • The findings of the survey may not be truly representative of the market as the project has a limited scope.
  • Research study was confined to Delhi only.
  • Lack of time acted as a major limitation in my study
  • It was very difficult to get fulfill the questionnaire because of respondent are busy in his own work and not providing sufficient time to fill the form seriously.
  • Though every care has been taken to eliminate such biases, but considering the human factor the possibility of small bias having come up cannot be ruled out altogether.

ANNEXURE

REFERENCES

  1. Shamoon, Sumaira, and Saiqa Tehseen. “Brand Management: What Next?” Interdisciplinary Journal Of Contemporary Research In Business 2.12 (2011): 435–441. Business Source Complete. Web. October 20, 2012
  2. “Neil McElroy’s Epiphany”P&G Changing the Face of Consumer Marketing. Harvard Business School. May 2, 2000. Retrieved March 9, 2011.
  3. True, Jacqui (2006). “Globalisation and Identity”. In Raymond Miller. Globalisation and Identity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press. p. 74. ISBN 978-0-19-558492-9.
  4. Keller, K.L. (1998), “Strategic Brand Management: Building, Measuring, and Managing Brand Equity”, Prentice-Hall International, Hemel Hempstead.
  5. Tauber, E.M. (1981), “Brand franchise extensions: new products benefit from existing brand names”, Business Horizons, 24(2), pp. 36-41.
  6. Muroma, M. and Saari, H (1996), “Fit as a determinant of success”, in Beracs, J., Baure, A. and Simon, J. (Eds), Marketing for Expanding Europe, Proceedings of 25th Annual Conference of European Marketing Academy, pp. 1953-63.
  7. Chen and Liu 2004. (incomplete citation)
  8. Aaker,D.A.(1990),“Brand extensions: ‘the good, the bad, the ugly’”, Sloan Management Review, pp. 47-56.
  9. Roedder-John, D., Loken, B. and Joiner, C. (1998), “The negative impact of extensions: can flagship products be diluted?”, Journal of Marketing, 62 (1), pp. 19-32

10.  “Brand Recognition Definition”. Investopedia. 2013-04-19. Retrieved 2013-04-29.

11.  Jump up^ Tan, Donald (2010). “Success Factors In Establishing Your Brand” Franchising and Licensing Association. Retrieved fromhttp://www.flasingapore.org /info_branding.php

QUESTIONNAIRE

APPENDIX

Dear Respondents,

I am MONICA AHUJA RAO a student of MBA, as a part of my curriculum; I am to take a research Project on “ANALYTICAL STUDY OF BRANDING & EXPANSION OF FRANCHISE NETWORK OF PRESCHOOL (A CASE STUDY OF KIDZEE)”. To enable to undertake above mentioned study, I request you to give your fair views. Your insights and perspective are important and valuable for my research.

Policy on Confidentiality: Please feel free to give your honest responses. The confidentiality of the information provided by the respondent is completely assured.

PERSONAL DATA

Q1. How long have you been working for KIDZEE?

a.  Less than 1 year

b. 1-3 years

c. 3-5 year’s

  1. 5 years  

e. Above 5 years

Q2. Do you agree that Preschool franchise, a profitable biz?

  1. Highly Agree
  2. Agree
  3. Neutral
  4. Highly disagree
  5. Disagree

Q3. Are you satisfied with the environment of KIDZEE ?

  1. Yes
  2. No

Q4. Do you agree that franchising is the safest way to start a business?

  1. Highly Agree
  2. Agree
  3. Neutral
  4. Highly disagree
  5. Disagree

Q5. Franchising is the best way to run a business?

  1. Yes
  2. No

Q6. I choose franchising because I want to start a brand of my own later?

  1. Highly Agree
  2. Agree
  3. Neutral
  4. Highly disagree
  5. Disagree

Q7. Do you agree that KIDZEE will take Advantage of Brand Identity?

  1. Highly Agree
  2. Agree
  3. Neutral
  4. Highly disagree
  5. Disagree

Q8. Existing infrastructure can be leveraged upon in a franchising option?

  1. Yes
  2. No

Q9. Do you know various tools fop branding and expansion of franchise network of Preschool?

  1. Yes
  2. No

Q10. You know resources does the franchisor have in place — and what resources is it willing to add– to handle growth?

  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Can’t say

Q11.Having adequate capital is necessary to minimize the financial risk associated with starting a new business.

  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Can’t say

————

37 thoughts on “MBA MARKETING PROJECT REPORT SAMPLE

  1. Pingback: cosmetics china
  2. Pingback: payday loans
  3. Pingback: x
  4. Pingback: Benefit Fakeup
  5. Pingback: buy viagra
  6. Pingback: Benefit Benetint
  7. Pingback: pochette miu miu

Leave a Reply